W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

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Susan
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by Susan » Tue Jul 19, 2011 12:37 am

It just occurred to me (I am slow) that the final scene most likely was Shroud and it foreshadowed whatever she did right after this in the series, seeing how the movie is set in between episodes.

Oh well.

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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by GenBoy » Thu Aug 11, 2011 1:35 am

usually i hear okaasan or mama that translated as mother, but it's the first time that i hear "ofukuro" translated as mother. what kind of person who use that calling?
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by Lunagel » Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:01 am

Typically guys, since it's a little more "manly" to say ofukuro. It's similar to calling parents the "old man" or "old lady". I knew someone who was surprised when they heard a guy call his mother "Kaa-san" since most guys apparently use the manlier (but slightly ruder) term.

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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by HyperDrake » Thu Aug 11, 2011 12:16 pm

GenBoy wrote:usually i hear okaasan or mama that translated as mother, but it's the first time that i hear "ofukuro" translated as mother. what kind of person who use that calling?
There's other words for Mother in Japanese aside from "okaa/kaa-(honorifics)" and "ofukuro". To mention a few:
- "Haha", with (or without) honorifics (ue, oya, gimi, go).
- "Reidou".
Its use depends on certain things.
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by GenBoy » Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:00 am

Lunagel wrote:Typically guys, since it's a little more "manly" to say ofukuro. It's similar to calling parents the "old man" or "old lady". I knew someone who was surprised when they heard a guy call his mother "Kaa-san" since most guys apparently use the manlier (but slightly ruder) term.
That's why Maria-san face expression looks like she let it slide when Katsumi calls her ofukuro.
HyperDrake wrote:There's other words for Mother in Japanese aside from "okaa/kaa-(honorifics)" and "ofukuro". To mention a few:
- "Haha", with (or without) honorifics (ue, oya, ,gimi, go).
- "Reidou".
Its use depends on certain things.
then can you explain it in brief on those honorifics that i bold it?
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by Lunagel » Sat Aug 27, 2011 10:09 am

母君 (Hahagimi) and 母御 (Hahago) are polite terms for your mother and someone elses' mother, respectively, though they're archaic and I don't believe in use since the feudal era. 令堂 (reidou) is a polite noun for "house/mother" but I don't think anyone actually called their mother "reidou" and in any case, this one is also an archaic term.

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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by HyperDrake » Sat Aug 27, 2011 11:07 am

GenBoy wrote:
HyperDrake wrote:There's other words for Mother in Japanese aside from "okaa/kaa-(honorifics)" and "ofukuro". To mention a few:
- "Haha", with (or without) honorifics (ue, oya, ,gimi, go).
- "Reidou".
Its use depends on certain things.
then can you explain it in brief on those honorifics that i bold it?
Geez...

1. Haha-gimi (kana: ははぎみ; kanji: 母君) >>> It serves as a polite reference to one's own mother.
Example:

"Aimiya wa, toku ni, haha-gimi to chichi-otodo o hanahada hidoku koi-shitai-moshi-age-nasatta" >>> "Aimiya, especially, keenly yearned for her father and mother".
I quote this from "At the House of Gathered Leaves: Shorter Biographical and Autobiographical Narratives from Japanese Court Literature" - Joshua S. Mostow

2. Haha-go (Hiragana: ははご; kanji: 母御) >>> It's a polite term for another's mother. A bit outdated, I think. I've encountered this in some of my manga or dorama.

3. Reidou (kana: れいどう; kanji: 令堂 ) >>> Another polite term for mother.
Example:

"Chijou no Reidou" >>> "Mother's Blind Love".
I read the term from one of my period dorama which I forgot the title.

You must be sticking your nose only on Japanese pop culture. Try Japanese period dorama or literatures for a change.
Lunagel wrote:令堂 (reidou) is a polite noun for "house/mother" but I don't think anyone actually called their mother "reidou" and in any case, this one is also an archaic term.
>>> Well, of course no one called their mother "reidou". It's not used for addressing or calling one's or other people' mother. Yes, it's an archaic term indeed.
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by Lunagel » Sat Aug 27, 2011 3:38 pm

Dude, chill out, those were very obscure terms you used, even I had to look them up. Not everyone's tastes run to period dramas, so there's no reason to be rude while explaining.

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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by GenBoy » Sat Aug 27, 2011 3:43 pm

HyperDrake wrote: You must be sticking your nose only on Japanese pop culture. Try Japanese period dorama or literatures for a change.
honestly yeah, i stuck my nose on Japanese pop culture all along. actually i rarely have an encounter anything about period drama etc. the "oldest one" that i encounter is an Shinobi and Goemon movie, anime Bakuhatsu blabla with OP song Kouya Ruten (forgot the anime title, because it's a hard-to-remember title), and Rainbow Nisha Rokubou no Shichinin.

anyway, thanks for explain them briefly.

edit: thank you post
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Re: W Forever Movie Director's Cut released

Post by Sexy_RoboVoice » Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:40 am

I'm in the process of going through the series itself, and while I haven't seen the W Forever film yet, I'm usually a fan of director's cut versions of films usually to see extra footage, sometimes extended cuts can feel more bloated than they should and the added footage tends to take away certain things rather than add to anything.

Case in point is the extended cut of 'Return of the King', it adds some great bits that tie up some loose ends not addresssed in its original theatrical cut, but some of the stuff that was added didn't seem necessary.

I wonder though if when I get around to it I should watch both versions to see which I like more. I guess I'll have to.

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